Saturday, October 14, 2017

Artificial Radio Hour with Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill Part 42


Hey folks!

Haruomi Hosono, Ryuichi Sakamoto, and Yukihiro Takahashi
This week’s show is music from Japan! It’s mainly electronic-based music from Yellow Magic Orchestra and associated acts, but there are a few other interesting bits thrown in.

The Mops!
So after last week’s return trip to Latin America, I decided to go to Japan. I was going to just do one show and try and cover all the bases, but I quickly realized that I have at least two shows worth of Japanese music. (This means a garage/psych show featuring Japanese bands is in the works!)

Haruomi Hosono (bass, keyboards, vocals), Ryuichi Sakamoto (keyboards, vocals), and Yukihiro Takahashi (drums, lead vocals)
The core of this show is the band Yellow Magic Orchestra. Formed in 1978 by Haruomi Hosono, it was a supergroup of sorts as he and the other band members (Ryuichi Sakamoto and Yukihiro Takahashi) had already been working in the music industry for many years.

The Yellow Magic Band, relaxing
They had worked together in various ways, but the first time they all worked together was recording Hosono’s 1978 “exotica-flavored” synthesizer-laden album Paraiso. They were credited as “Harry Hosono and the Yellow Magic Band” apparently as a satire of Japan’s obsession with black magic at the time. The track “Shambala Signal” comes from that recording.

Hosono recorded a series of Exotica-styled albums with a loose association of artists under the name Tin Pan Alley after his band Happy End broke up in 1974. After Paraiso, he recorded Cochin Moon, a soundtrack to an imaginary Bollywood film. This featured the track “Hum Ghar Sajan”, perhaps the first example of an electronic raga.

Yukihiro Takahashi, Ryuichi Sakamoto, and Haruomi Hosono
Yellow Magic Orchestra was hugely successful in Japan and internationally. They are considered innovators in the field of electronic pop music. They were one of the first bands to incorporate video game sounds, and later the favor was returned when cover versions of their song “Rydeen” appeared in more than one video game.

Hideki Matsutake
Isao Tomita
The unofficial “fourth member” of YMO was Hideki Matsutake, a composer, arranger, and computer programmer. He was primarily responsible for the synth programming on the early YMO albums, using techniques he had learned under “classical electronic” superstar (Isao) Tomita whose assistant he had been. Matsutake formed the group Logic System in 1981 with Makoto Irie, and they have released 10 albums to date.


"Takoyaki (たこ焼き or 蛸焼) is a ball-shaped Japanese snack made of a wheat flour-based batter and cooked in a special molded pan. It is typically filled with minced or diced octopus (tako), tempura scraps (tenkasu), pickled ginger, and green onion. Takoyaki are brushed with takoyaki sauce (similar to Worcestershire sauce) and mayonnaise, and then sprinkled with green laver (aonori) and shavings of dried bonito."
- Wikipedia

As for the Takoyaki Song, I don’t really have much info.



Katamari Damacy (塊魂 Katamari Damashii, lit. "clump spirit") was a PlayStation 2 game from 2004 that was a whole lot of fun. You had to roll a sort of sticky ball around the world, and stuff would stick to it, making it bigger. You had a time limit to build it up to a certain size, so that your father, the King of the Cosmos, could turn it into a star to replace the stars he had accidentally destroyed. Only things smaller than the ball would stick to it, so initially you’d roll up stuff like matches and coins, work your way up to bikes and sharks and people, then later cars, buildings, ocean liners, and finally the Moon. It was amazing. The music, by Yuu Miyake, is as fun as the game itself.


Himuro Yoshiteru is an electronic music musician and DJ from Japan, but I don't know much about him past that. Wikipedia isn't a whole lot of help either:
"His style is often described in the media as very playful. It consists of finely chopped, fast rhythms in combination with jazzy bass and synthesizer lines and 8bit sounds (like video game music). In this area he is one of the prominent Japanese musicians of this time. In his Live Acts he uses primarily his laptop, MIDI controllers and effects processors."
That's what Wikipedia calls a "stub".


Leave a question or comment where you read this, and I'll talk to you next week!

Enjoy!

-Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill


The Sea Named "Solaris" (Based on Three-Part Invention No. 2 in C Minor, BWV 788; Ich Ruf Zu Dir, Herr Jesu Christ, BWV 639) - Tomita (1978)


Intro - Logic System (1981)

XY? - Logic System (1981)


Citizens Of Science - Yellow Magic Orchestra (1980)

Shambhala Signal - Harry Hosono and the Yellow Magic Band (1978

Jordan, Jesse, Go! Episode 457: Wet Spot with Janine Brito 12/05/2016


Rydeen - Yellow Magic Orchestra (1979)


たこやきのうた (Takoyaki Song) - 宇高香里とたこボールキッズ (Utaka Kaori & Tako Ball Kids) (2011)

Paraiso - Harry Hosono and the Yellow Magic Band (1978)


Non-Standard Mixture - Haruomi Hosono (1984)

Stop Podcasting Yourself Episode 446 - Taz VanRassel 10/03/2016


“Katamari Nah-Nah" (ナナナン塊 Nananan Katamari) (Katamari Damacy Main Title) - Yuu Miyake (2004)

"The Moon & The Prince" (月と王子) (Katamari Damacy Bear Stage) - Akitaka Tohyama (vocals by Kenji Ninuma & Fumina (chorus)) (2004)


One Day Of The Beetle - Himuro (2004)

The Jackie and Laurie Show -  Start With A Dead Guy 10/03/2016


Hum Ghar Sajan - Haruomi Hosono & Tadanori Yokoo (1978)


Dark Side Of The Star / 地球の夜にむけての夜想曲 - Haruomi Hosono With Friends Of Earth (1984)

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Artificial Radio Hour with Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill Part 41



Hey folks!

A bit of a vague theme this week. Almost all of these groups are Latin American, mostly from Mexico but also Brazil and the United States.


Os Mutantes (The Mutants) are a psychedelic group from Brazil. Their songs have a lot of different sections, like this one does.


Los Chijuas are (were?) a garage rock type of group from Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. This song showed up on the compilation Nuggets II: Original Artyfacts from the British Empire and Beyond. That was a sequel to the popular compilation Nuggets: Original Artyfacts From The First Psychedelic Era 1964-1968, which had a bunch of garage/psych bands from roughly the post-Beatles/Stones/Yardbirds era. Nuggets II was basically the international version, with bands from Mexico, England, Austrailia, Japan & more. Fun stuff, I may use more of that stuff in the future.


Lafayette Afro Rock Band were an American funk-rock group from Long Island who relocated to Paris in 1971. They show up on a lot of African music compilations, although they are not from Africa.


Maria Sabina was a Mazatec Curandera from the Mexican state of Oaxaca who was one of the first people to perform the traditional Velada mushroom ceremony for outsiders, specifically for R. G. Wasson, who recorded the ceremony for Folkways Records and wrote an article about it for Life Magazine. This resulted in a stream of magic mushroom-seeking hippies beating a path to her small village. She late regretted the whole experience, saying
"From the moment the foreigners arrived, the 'holy children' lost their purity. They lost their force, they ruined them. Henceforth they will no longer work. There is no remedy for it."
 Meanwhile I used her voice as a background to a guy talking about wandering around Disney's California Adventure on MDMA...

There are four tracks this week from a compilation called "Mexican Rock And Roll Rumble And Psych-Out South Of The Border", by Los Apson (from Agua Prieta, Sonora), Los Crazy Boys (Ciudad de México), Los Sinners (Ciudad de México), and Los Santos Del Rock (from... somewhere in Mexico?). They're a lot of fun.


Nat "King" Cole released two albums of songs in Spanish in the late 50s. They're pretty good, his pronunciation isn't bad even though it wasn't his first language.


Elis Regina recorded an album of Antonio Carlos Jobim tunes with Antonio Carlos Jobim. Their version of Águas de Março basically became the most well-known version. Listen for the part near the end when she starts laughing, it's wonderful.


Marc Ribot is a guitarist from New Jersey who has played many styles of music. He has played with musicians as diverse as Tom Waits, Elvis Costello, and John Zorn (I should put those guys on a podcast, huh?) Los Cubanos Postizos (The Prosthetic Cubans) was a band he formed in the 90s. Their albums mostly consist of songs by Cuban bandleader and composer Arsenio Rodriguez, although the song I included here is by Puerto Rican songwriter Pedro Flores. (Also, I have just noticed that the album, ¡Muy Divertido!, was released on my 24th birthday. That does not seem like a long time ago, but I guess it was.)

David Byrne's 1989 album Rei Momo is similar in that it is by a New York-based artist who has worked on the artier areas of pop music, working in a Latin American style. Byrne uses a different style for each track and labels them. "The Rose Tattoo" is a Bomba/Mozambique, according to the liner notes.


Sandie Shaw is a British singer who was the first performer from the UK to win the Eurovision Song Contest (in 1967). She recorded her 1965 single "Long Live Love" in English, German ("Du weißt Nichts von deinem Glück"), French ("Pourvu que ça dure"), Italian ("Viva l'amore con te"), and Spanish ("¡Viva El Amor!"). This wasn't an uncommon practice; even the Beatles recorded a couple singles in German.


Finally, Chingo Bling. I was hoping to find a little more info about this guy, but there's not a whole lot out there. He's a Mexican-American rapper from the Houston area, whose persona was not a drug kingpin, but rather a Tamale kingpin. He mostly does stand-up comedy now. This song is about his pet rooster.

As usual, please leave any comments or questions wherever you read this, and I'll talk to you next week!

Enjoy!

-Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill

Welcome to Night Vale 95 - Zookeeper 9/30/2016 (music by Disparition)


Panis et Circensis (Bread and Circuses) - Os Mutantes (1968)


Changing the Colors of Life - Los Chijuas (1968)


Racubah - Lafayette Afro Rock Band (1974)

Movie Fighters Episode 69: VS Horror Express 10/19/2016


Na Ai - Ni Tso - Maria Sabina (1957)



Sueno De Amor - Los Crazy Boys (1967)


Quizas, Quizas, Quizas (Perhaps, Perhaps, Perhaps) - Nat King Cole (1958)



Águas de Março (Waters of March) - Elis Regina & Antonio Carlos Jobim (1974)

Jordan, Jesse GO! Ep. 455: Live at Now Hear This Festival with the Doughboys 11/21/2016)

Soft Singing - Maria Sabina (1956)



Satisfaction - Los Apson (1965)


No Puedo Frenar - Marc Ribot & Los Cubanos Postizos (2000)


The Rose Tattoo (Bomba-Mozambique) - David Byrne (1989)

Jordan, Jesse GO! Ep. 455: Live at Now Hear This Festival with the Doughboys 11/21/2016)

Humming, Etc. - Maria Sabina (1956)


La Noyia De Mi Mejor Amigo - Los Sinners (1961)


¡Viva El Amor! - Sandie Shaw (1965)



"Walk Like Cleto" - Chingo Bling (2005)

Monday, October 2, 2017

Artificial Radio Hour with Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill Part 40



Hey folks!

Here you go, it's a Southern Africa bonanza!

Here's the write-up I promised you. This show is longer than usual, but that's because of the "hidden track" at the end. Don't miss that one!


"African Jazz Mokili Mobimba" was the theme song of The African Beat, a great show that was on KCRW for many years. I couldn't remember how to spell the title, so at first, I found a lot of information about a Congolese cryptid, a modern-day dinosaur called the "Mokele-Mbembe".


George Sibanda was a pretty big star for a number of years in Sub-Saharan Africa, but not much is really known about him. There are no known photos, and even the dates of his recordings are hard to nail down. ("Between 48 and 52". I split the difference and guessed at 1950.) His song, "Guabi Guabi" was also the theme to a show on KCRW, a gardening program. I always wanted to sing along, but the only word I could understand was "banana".


Billy West recorded a number of Trump quotes in the voice of Zapp Branigan, with Maurice LaMarche as his first officer Kif. The SubGenius Hour Of Slack podcast used a bunch of them, and I have spread them all through this week's show. Underneath them is a flute solo by an unknown Mahafaly musician from Madagascar. It was taken from a 78, included on the Grammy-winning compilation Opika Pende: Africa at 78 RPM (Recordings from 1909-1960s). It was actually put together by a guy I know, Jonathan Ward. Neat, huh?


Dorothy Masuka was born in Zimbabwe but moved to South Africa as a child. She has been a professional singer since she was 1954 and still performs today.


Jean Bosco Mwenda, aka Mwenda wa Bayeke, was a pioneer of the Congolese fingerstyle guitar. He was his popularity extended to East Africa, and he had a radio show in Nairobi for a number of years, influencing many Kenyan musicians. I'll probably cover East Africa on another show...


The music under the first Jordan, Jesse, Go! clip is by a guy from the Seychelles called Thomas Alexie (or maybe Alexis?). I don't know when it was recorded, but I'm gonna guess the late 70s based on the instrumentation. I just used the intro, what sounds like a drum machine and an organ.


Bonga was born José Adelino Barceló de Carvalho in Angola, which was a colony of Portugal at that time. He used his status as a star athlete to aid independence fighters, which eventually got him exiled. He recorded his first album Angola 72 in Rotterdam, and its "seditious lyrics" resulted in a warrant for his arrest. He returned home in 1975 after the events of the "Carnation Revolution" resulted in Angolan independence.


South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela had a number one hit with Grazing In The Grass in 1968.

The second Jordan, Jesse, GO! clip has music underneath it by Amampondo, a percussion ensemble from Langa, Cape Town, South Africa. I slowed it down slightly. They use marimbas tuned to both Xhosa and Afro-diatonic scales.


Mahlathini Nezintombi Zomgqashiyo with Makgona Tshole Band, aka Malathini and the Mahotella Queens, were a South African mbaqanga supergroup. They had success in the 60s and 70s, but appearances on albums such as the compilation The Indestructible Beat of Soweto (where this recording appeared) led them to newfound international success. I saw them perform in Palos Verdes at the Norris Theater in 1992. They brought down the house.



Ladysmith Black Mambazo also appeared on that compilation, which led to their guest appearances on Paul Simon's "Graceland" and even Sesame Street!


Mbube (The Lion), by Solomon Linda, was written in 1939. Also known as "The Lion Sleeps Tonight", or "Wimoweh", "Wimba Way" or "Awimbawe", it was assumed by many westerners to be a traditional folk song. This is why Linda was not paid the millions in royalties he was owed. A lawsuit against the Walt Disney Company, who used his song in The Lion King, eventually got his estate a portion of the money they were owed. This version is by "Mama Africa", Miriam Makeba, from her 1960 album..


If you keep listening past the "regular" end of the show, there is a secret track. Performed by Orchestre Folkorique Tout Puissant Likembé Konono Nº1 de Mingiedi, aka "Konono Nº1", this half-hour jam was usually played by them in the mornings to give their singer (who had been singing all night long) a chance to rest. Konono Nº1 plays homemade electrified likembe, and
"percussion instruments that are made out of items salvaged from a junkyard. The group's amplification equipment is equally rudimentary, including a microphone carved out of wood fitted with a magnet from an automobile alternator and a gigantic horn-shaped [speaker]" - wikipedia.com/Konono_Nº1

They're fantastic, and I hope you love them.

Enjoy!

- Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill


African Jazz Mokili Mobimba - Le Grand Kallé et l'African Jazz (1961)


Guabi Guabi - George Sibanda (1950)

Billy West as Zapp Brannigan as Trump, with Maurice LaMarche as Kif Kroker, taken from The SubGenius Hour of Slack #1589 - The Show That Refused to Die Again 9/26/2016

Flute solo (Ampanihy, Madagascar) (edit) - Unknown Mahafaly (2011)


Hapo Zamani - Dorothy Masuka (1963)

Billy West as Zapp Brannigan as Trump, with Maurice LaMarche as Kif Kroker, taken from The SubGenius Hour of Slack #1589 - The Show That Refused to Die Again 9/26/2016


Flute solo (Ampanihy, Madagascar) (edit) - Unknown Mahafaly (2011)


Masanga (Katanga, Congo) - Jean Bosco Mwenda (1952)

Billy West as Zapp Brannigan as Trump, with Maurice LaMarche as Kif Kroker, taken from The SubGenius Hour of Slack #1589 - The Show That Refused to Die Again 9/26/2016

Jordan, Jesse GO! Ep. 455: Live at Now Hear This Festival with the Doughboys 11/21/2016)

Mon Dorina (edit) - Thomas Alexie (late 70s- early 80s?)


Mona Ki Ngi Xica - Bonga (1972)

Billy West as Zapp Brannigan as Trump, with Maurice LaMarche as Kif Kroker, taken from The SubGenius Hour of Slack #1589 - The Show That Refused to Die Again 9/26/2016

Flute solo (Ampanihy, Madagascar) (edit) - Unknown Mahafaly (2011)


Grazing In The Grass - Hugh Masekela (1968)


Jordan, Jesse GO! Ep. 454: Big Boy with Ian Karmel 11/14/2016

Billy West as Zapp Brannigan as Trump, with Maurice LaMarche as Kif Kroker, taken from The SubGenius Hour of Slack #1589 - The Show That Refused to Die Again 9/26/2016

9 15 (edit) - Amampondo (2000)

Dali Ngiyakuthanda Bati Ha-Ha-Ha - George Sibanda (1952)


Ngicabange Ngaqeda - Mahlathini Nezintombi Zomgqashiyo with Makgona Tshole Band (1983)

Billy West as Zapp Brannigan as Trump, with Maurice LaMarche as Kif Kroker, taken from The SubGenius Hour of Slack #1589 - The Show That Refused to Die Again 9/26/2016

Flute solo (Ampanihy, Madagascar) (edit) - Unknown Mahafaly (2011)


Nansi Imali - Ladysmith Black Mambazo (1981)

Billy West as Zapp Brannigan as Trump, with Maurice LaMarche as Kif Kroker, taken from The SubGenius Hour of Slack #1589 - The Show That Refused to Die Again 9/26/2016

Flute solo (Ampanihy, Madagascar) (edit) - Unknown Mahafaly (2011)


Mbube - Miriam Makeba (1960)


Mungua-Mungua - Orchestre Folkorique Tout Puissant Likembé Konono Nº1 de Mingiedi (1978)