Saturday, December 16, 2017

Artificial Radio Hour with Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill Part 51


Not pictured: Pia Zadora


Hey folks!

I got this week’s show uploaded to the Internet Archive, so maybe it was a problem with last week’s show, I don’t know. I’ve also put this week’s show on MixCloud, let me know if that is something you all are into.



For various reasons, I’ve written this email/blog post multiple times, so if it sounds terse and weird that might be why. It’s mostly gonna be a list of facts.

“Seymour Swine” is North Carolina disc jockey Denny Brownlee (vocals) and Bill Lynn (guitar), although I’m pretty sure it just said “Porky Pig” when I first ran into it.

The 12 Days Of Mixmas had a Crypt Keeper clip (in the original DJ Riko version) that I swapped out for the cast of Twin Peaks.





The Barenaked Ladies have a whole Christmas album, but I only know this one song. It sounds like something developed on a tour bus.

The celebrity Xmas greetings are all from Bob Claster, former host of Funny Stuff on KCRW, which was my first exposure to many wonderful comedians. Check out his website, Bob Claster's Funny Stuff, for lots of great comedy shows.




My friend Bob is in Inch Erectionists, but I don’t remember who else is. Spell check does not like that spelling.

It’s hard to listen to bad kid singers, so I cut them quite short. There are a lot of that type of tune, though. I think they were trying to follow in the footsteps of “Nuttin’ For Christmas” and “Two Front Teeth” but they miss by a wide mark. “I Want The South To Win The War”? Really, Spike? I do like the Eyeball Skeleton song though.





I’m not sure of the date on the John Baker BBC Radiophonic Workshop jingle, but I know it was between 1960 and 1968 so I just split the difference.

I think the Fear song was performed on New Wave Theatre, but it seems a little much for UHF or even basic cable. I dunno.

Christmas In The Stars” is from the Star Wars Christmas album of the same name. It’s pretty weird. It was by Meco Monardo, the same guy who had a disco hit with the Star Wars theme in 1977. Fun fact, Jon Bon Jovi appears on this record; his brother owned the studio where it was recorded and Jon worked there. (Not sure how “fun” that was.)



Tom Lehrer is a national treasure, and it’s a shame he didn’t record more music. I guess teaching at UC Santa Cruz is a good career too.

That's Jerry Wheeler, in the center.

Poxy Boggards are a band featuring the trombone player of Giant Ant Farm, one of my favorite bands. They perform at Renaissance Faires. Here they cover a Residents song.

Mojo Nixon gave away mp3s of his entire musical catalog on Amazon for free, so naturally I had to have it all. Usually there are vocals.

I don’t know anything about Game Theory except that they were active in the 80s. I couldn’t find this song listed in any discography, so I don’t know if it’s really theirs.



“Xmas On Mars” is from the Thrilling Adventure Hour serial “Sparks Nevada, Marshal On Mars”. One of the performers on this track is Chris Hardwick.

Pia Zadora was in Santa Claus Conquers The Martians as a child; that movie featured a song called “Hooray For Santy Claus”. This version is a cover.

“Santa Doesn't Cop Out on Dope” is also a cover, of a Martin Mull song from 1971.

You can find out about “Jingle Rock Bell” in this metafilter thread. It’s only a couple of sentences, but they are illuminating.


Trademark G(underson) of the ECC with his Thimbletronic gloves.

The Evolution Control Committee are a great bunch of cut-up artists. I first heard of them when they dropped their single, “Rocked By Rape”, on napster with misleading artists names.

I wonder if Squeaky Fromme really does love Christmas.


Jonathan Coulton and John Roderick are great. I’m gonna put some more Coulton Xmas music in next week’s show.

Porn Orchard was a band from Athens, GA. I don't think their vocalists always sounded like Peter Murphy & Tom Waits, but maybe. This one is often misidentified on file-sharing sites.



Brian Whitman’s Singular Christmas album was created by putting hundreds of Christmas songs into a computer, so that the computer could… learn how to make its own I guess? There is a much better explanation of it at his website.



Rod Rogers worked for MSR Records, a “song-poem” label. Song-poem records can get really weird…

Seagull Screaming Kiss Her Kiss Her was a Japanese band. This track was misidentified as Melt Banana but I knew that wasn’t right because there wasn’t enough screaming.

I don’t know who Silev is.
That’s it, you guys! More Xmas next week! (Is that a promise or a threat?)


Enjoy!

-Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill




B-B-Blue Christmas - Seymour Swine and the Squealers (1985)




The 12 Days of Mixmas (Roger Whittaker, Sesame Street, the McKenzie Brothers, The Waffle House, the cast of Twin Peaks and Twisted Sister) - DJ Riko (2006) (with a little help from Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill, 2017)

Deck the Stills - Barenaked Ladies (2004)

Santa Fake - Inch Erectionists (2005)

I Want The South To Win The War For Christmas - Spike Jones And The Band That Plays For Fun (1959)





Poor Ole Santa Claus - Jeri Kelly (1960)

Christmas on the Moon - Troy Hess (1970)

Season's Greetings From Jackie Mason

Merry Christmas Elvis - Michele Cody (1978)

Happy Birthday Jesus - Little Cindy (1959)

Santa's On The Run - Eyeball Skeleton (2004)

Christmas Commercial - BBC Radiophonic Workshop (John Baker) (1964)


Fuck Christmas - Fear (1981)



Christmas In The Stars - The Star Wars Intergalactic Droid Choir & Chorale (1980)

(I'm Spending) Hanukkah In Santa Monica - Tom Lehrer (1999)

Santa Dog - Poxy Boggards (1996)



Transylvanian Xmas - Mojo Nixon And Skid Roper (1986)

Christmas Moog - Game Theory (198?)

Xmas On Mars - Paul and Storm & Hard n Phirm (2011)

Season's Greetings from Pia Zadora




Hooray For Santy Claus - Senor Tonto Christmas Combo (2004)



Santa Doesn't Cop Out on Dope - Sonic Youth (1996)

Jingle Rock Bell - P. S. Tail, Esq. (2004)

The Christmas Wrong - The Evolution Control Committee (2003)

My Wife Thinks She's A Christmas Tree - Soupy Sales

Even Squeaky Fromme Loves Christmas - The Reverend Glen Armstrong (1994)

Uncle John - Jonathan Coulton & John Roderick (2012)

This Holiday Season (Christmas Sucks) - Porn Orchard (2005)

Radiant bells - Brian Whitman (2004)

Santa Claus Goes Modern - Rod Rogers & The Librettos (1969)

Here Comes Santa Claus - Seagull Screaming Kiss Her Kiss Her (1996)

Christmas Song (The Holly And The Ivy) - Silev (????)




Silent Night - nullsleep (2003)

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Artificial Radio Hour with Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill Part 50


Hey there folks!

Sorry the show is late, in addition to being long. The length usually means it will come together quickly but not so in this case. The problems I've been having with the Internet Archive haven't delayed me that much, but they haven't helped.

Here is a Dropbox link, please let me know how that works for you.

Well, the plan was to have this one finished early so I could get ahead. And here we are, it's not early and I’m not ahead. Oh well.

This is the pop/easy listening end of the Moog craze of the late 60s, generally. Wendy Carlos’ Switched-On Bach from 1968 sparked a load of mostly novelty, cash-in records at first, but some artists went deeper than just covering the hits of the day. In fact, some of the artists who performed on these records were already old hands at the synth game who were just trying to cash in themselves…


Four songs in the show this week are by “Christopher Scott” a.k.a. Jean-Jacques Perrey, a French electronic musician and composer. In 1969 he released an album called Switched-On Bacharach, with ten Burt Bacharach covers. It must have been a success because he released a follow-up in 1970 called More Switched-On Bacharach with eleven more tunes. (Interestingly enough, he apparently gave his alter-ego a knighthood, because he’s credited as “Sir Christopher Scott” on the second album.) When Perrey recorded library music for the Editions Montparnasse 2000 label, he used the name “Pat Prilly”.
Dan Lacksmann released three albums of primarily covers as The Discotheque Sound. He went on to greater success with the band Telex, even reaching the Eurovision finals (although they were aiming for last place).


 Kenny Ascher, Alan Foust, and Norman Dolph had two albums as The Moog Machine, the first was Switched-On Rock and the second was a Christmas album. Ascher went on to co-write “The Rainbow Connection” with Paul Williams, and Dolph wrote the novelty hit “Life Is A Rock (But The Radio Rolled Me)”, which led to a lawsuit (and probably a very lucrative settlement) when MacDonald's ripped it off. I don’t know what Foust got up to.


Brian Kehew and Roger Joseph Manning Jr. briefly revived the “Moog covers album” concept starting in the late 90s as The Moog Cookbook. Sporting masks and aliases (Uli Nomi and Meco Eno) the duo played the alt-rock hits of the day in a retro, analog-synth style.


Sy Mann was a pianist and arranger on the Arthur Godfrey Show on CBS, but pretty much all of the albums he released under his own name were Christmas music played on the organ. “Switched-On Santa” is supposedly played on a Moog, but I suspect most of it is actually a Wurlitzer organ with a lot of echo effects.


Aivi & Surasshu compose music for Steven Universe, which is probably the best cartoon out right now.



 
Q.R. Ghazala is the inventor of a technique called “circuit-bending” that he uses to create electronic musical instruments out of electronic toys. The sounds created are really great.


Gil Trythall is primarily a composer of contemporary electronic classical music, but like many others, he saw a possible money-making opportunity after Switched-On Bach and released Switched-On Nashville in 1970. (It seems Switched-On Country was taken.)


Gershon Kingsley was Jean-Jacques Perrey’s partner in the duo of Perrey-Kingsley. Their big hit album was The In Sound from Way Out! It was released in 1966, before everything had to have “switched-on” or “Moog” in the title. “Baroque Hoedown”, from that album, was later used as the theme for Disney’s Main Street Electrical Parade. On his own, he wrote the song “Pop Corn” which was on his 1969 album Music To Moog By. (See?)


Dick Hyman has a funny name, and also preceded Sy Mann as the pianist and arranger for Arthur Godfrey. He released many easy-listening classics, including multiple synth albums.

Whew. It’s taken me forever to write this up, I’m definitely going monthly next year. Talk to you all next week!

Enjoy!

-Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill


I Say A Little Prayer - Christopher Scott (1969)



Son Of My Father - The Discotheque Sound (1972)
 


Spinning Wheel - The Moog Machine (1969)

Free-Fallin' - The Moog Cookbook (1996)

Jordan, Jesse, GO! Ep. 468: Guitar Lick and a Moan with Nick Adams 2/20/2017 (Reggae Whites)



Relaxation - Pat Prilly (1971)

Santa Claus Is Coming To Town - Sy Mann (1970)


 
Evenflow - The Moog Cookbook (1996)

Little Fugue in G Minor - Wendy Carlos (1973)

Buddy Holly - The Moog Cookbook (1996) 


My Favorite Things - Sy Mann    (1970)

Quiet Village - Martin Denny (1969)

Jordan, Jesse, GO! Ep. 468: Guitar Lick and a Moan with Nick Adams 2/20/2017 (Juggalo Soda)


Glitch City - Aivi & Surasshu (2014)

Arabesque No. 1 - Isao Tomita (1974) 


The Look Of Love - Christopher Scott (1969)

Jordan, Jesse, GO! Ep. 468: Guitar Lick and a Moan with Nick Adams 2/20/2017 (t-shirt ad)

This is a Trigon Incantor, but it did used to be a Touch & Tell.
Touch & Tell 2 - Q.R. Ghazala


 Yakety Moog - Gil Trythall (1970)



 The One I Love - The Moog Cookbook (1996)


A medley, edited by me, Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill, featuring:
  • the beginning of Visa To The Stars - Perrey-Kingsley (1966)
  • the middle of Coconut - The Discotheque Sound (1972)
  • the middle of The Legend Of Johnny Pot - Dick Hyman (1969)
  • the ending of Visa To The Stars - Perrey-Kingsley (1966)

White Christmas - Sy Mann (1970)

Tonto's Travels (Tontomotion) - Tonto's Expanding Head Band (1974)



Time Is Tight - Dick Hyman (1969)

What The World Needs Now Is Love - Christopher Scott (1969)

Basket Case - The Moog Cookbook (1996)

Poem For Bali - Wendy Carlos (1986)

Walk On By - Christopher Scott (1969)

Cybernaut - Tonto's Expanding Head Band (1971)



The Main Street Electrical Parade - Don Dorsey & Jack Wagner (arr.) (1977)
Silent Night - Sy Mann (1970)

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Artificial Radio Hour with Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill Part 49

This EMS Synthi 100 is not heard in this podcast



Hey folks!

This episode is basically part two of episode 47, the one with the mostly electronic, mostly soundtrack stuff.

Thanksgiving kinda set me back a bit, so I’m going lower-effort for a couple of weeks. This show and the next one will be more of that episode 47 stuff, without any podcast clips included. I’m gonna try and get a bit ahead of the game, hopefully I can.

This one is about half soundtrack stuff and half electronic stuff that maybe could be on a soundtrack.

The designer of this poster definitely saw the poster for Thief.
 
The first and last tracks are from the soundtrack of the 2011 movie Drive. I don’t know much about the artists, but they’re both really great atmospheric pieces. If you’ve never seen Drive, I recommend it. It’s a neon-tinged noir film set in Los Angeles with a really great cast (Ryan Gosling, Bryan Cranston, Christina Hendricks, Albert Brooks). It gets pretty violent, but it’s really good.


 I’ve mentioned The Tripods before, I really like Ken Freeman’s synth-y score.

People expect Giorgio to have sunglasses and a moustache.

Giorgio Moroder is (yet again) an electronic music pioneer, in his case a disco pioneer. He started his career writing bubblegum pop like his early hit “Son Of My Father” (as heard on Episode 38), but had great success later using synths and drum machines on songs like “Love To Love You Baby” and “I Feel Love” for Donna Summer. His own records are a lot of fun, with vocoder vocals for that robotic effect.

More Magic Sword, I really can’t get enough of those guys. I bet they’ll score a movie someday, I just hope it’s a good movie.

When he doesn't have sunglasses and a moustache, it's harder to recognize him.

Daft Punk is a French electronic duo who, like Magic Sword, wear masks. They don’t appear in public without their robot masks… but I guess if they did you wouldn’t really know. This track is their Moroder tribute, featuring Giorgio talking about his life and career.

Another Griffin McElroy track, which is simultaneously another Mort Garson track! I love that Plantasia album, and I guess Griffin does too.


Jean-Michel Jarre’s biggest hit from his biggest album is Oxygène (Part IV). A second-generation film composer, this was his first non-soundtrack album. It seems very French to me somehow, despite not having any lyrics. It really is classic “space music” though, and it became something Jarre went back to again and again. (By the way, this track is also available on the 1994 as-seen-on-TV compilation “Pure Moods”, so if it rings a bell that could be why.)


I’ve never seen Assault On Precinct 13, but I love the score by director John Carpenter. It’s interesting to compare it to Oxygène (Part IV), which also was released in 1976.

I kind of imagine the structure of this episode in cinematic terms, and Assault On Precinct 13 leads us into the third act. The “epic guitar solo act”, if you will.

The poster is not the only similarity between Thief and Drive.

Although “Beach Theme” is not the main title music of Michael Mann’s 1981 film Thief, it’s probably the most epic piece. It certainly has the most epic guitar solo.

Aerodynamic was not written for a film soundtrack, but all of the tracks from Daft Punk’s 2001 album Discovery were used in the animated space opera Interstella 5555: The 5tory of the 5ecret 5tar 5ystem. It also has "impossible, ridiculous Yngwie guitar arpeggios" and a great baroque synth coda.

Finally, the epic guitar solo section concludes with Magic Sword. This live version of this track is the one that was heard in the Thor: Ragnarok trailer. None more epic.

No sunglasses, but it's still definitely Giorgio.
 
After that cinematic climax comes the credits. Giorgio Moroder’s 1979 album E=MC² luckily has credits included in the last track. I love that the tea lady gets a credit!

A Real Hero, again from the Drive soundtrack, is our post credits song, something to hum as you walk out into the lobby.

That’s it for this week! Hopefully I’ll get the next episode out by Sunday, and I’ll try to keep to my schedule for the last couple weeks of the year. Fingers crossed!

Leave a comment wherever you read this, and I’ll talk to you next time.

Enjoy!

- Rev. Dr. Dr. Phill


Nightcall - Kavinsky & Lovefoxxx (2011) 0:06-4:26

Ozymandias - Ken Freeman (1984) 4:15-5:08

Utopia - Me Giorgio - Giorgio Moroder (1977) 5:02-8:21

Retrogram (Scattle Remix) - Magic Sword (2016) 8:19-12:10


Giorgio by Moroder - Daft Punk (2013) 12:03-21:08

Plantasia - Griffin McElroy (2016) 21:05-24:24

Oxygène (Part IV) - Jean-Michel Jarre (1976) 24:11-27:27
Assault On Precinct 13 (main title) - John Carpenter (1976) 27:18-30:50

Beach Theme - Tangerine Dream (1981) 30:30-34:13

Aerodynamic - Daft Punk (2001) 34:07-37:36

In The Face Of Evil (Live) - Magic Sword (2017) 37:31-43:31

E=MC²    - Giorgio Moroder (1979) 43:23-47:57

A Real Hero (feat. Electric Youth) - College (2011) 47:54-52:22

I like this poster better than the other one, but I like the typeface better on the other one,